Tag Archives | accessories

DIY felt daffodil headband tutorial

Our A Year of Wreaths project with Laura Howard ended in December and we wanted to do a few more posts to show you how the templates and tutorials she shared in the series could be used to create a whole bunch of different projects! Here is the first post in this spin off series, with a tutorial for a pretty spring daffodil headband. Daffodils have recently become available again and they are just the best! So it’s perfect timing for this spring headband which is just as cheerful as the flower it represents. Over to you, Laura!

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

One of the awesome things about felt crafting is how easy it is to get creative and adapt projects to make new things. Swap ribbon for a brooch clasp to turn an ornament into a brooch, stuff a pincushion with lavender to turn it into a lavender sachet, enlarge some brooch templates and use them to add an applique design to a cushion…there are always so many crafty possibilities!

Inspired by this, here is the first of our series of fun ideas for things you can make using templates and tutorials I’ve previously shared here on The Daily Stitch

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

To make this cute and colourful felt headband you will need:

* The template sheet from the March Daffodil Wreath tutorial
* Wool blend felt in Banana Cream and Hallows Eve
* Orange stranded embroidery thread
* A plastic headband / Alice band
* Yellow sewing thread
* Sewing scissors
* Embroidery scissors (these are great for cutting out small or fiddly shapes!)
* Optional: pinking shears
* Sewing needles and pins
* A glue gun and glue
* A heat-proof mat for the glue gun
* Newspaper to protect your workspace from any glue drips

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

To make the headband:

Use the Narcissi templates from the Daffodil Wreath tutorial to cut out the following felt pieces: ten yellow petal pieces, five orange trumpet pieces and five orange circles.

When you cut each trumpet cut along three sides of the template with sewing scissors and along the remaining (long) side with pinking shears – just above the edge of the paper template. If you don’t have any pinking shears you could use embroidery scissors to cut a zigzagged edge, or just cut a straight edge.

Follow steps 3, 4 and 5 from the Daffodil Wreath tutorial to sew the trumpet and petals together.

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

Use a glue gun to stick the flower pieces to a plastic headband: first the petals, then the trumpets. Start with the central flower and work outwards, adding a small amount of glue to the felt pieces and pressing them in place very carefully.

IMPORTANT: take care when working with the glue gun as the glue gets very hot! Always place it on a heat-proof mat when not in use, and use newspaper or other scrap paper to protect your workspace. Work slowly, squeezing the gun with care to control the amount of glue you’re using and keeping your fingers out of the way of the hot glue.

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

DIY felt daffodil girl's headband tutorial

Additional photography by September Pictures.

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Tutorial! Vegan leather star headband

We have these really cool packs of vegan leather in stock, but what can we make with them?! We put the question to the super talented Laura Howard and this is the third of four tutorials she’s written for us! Find all of the tutorials in the series here.

Vegan Leather Star Headband Tutorial

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

I’m so excited to share some ideas for using these awesome packs of synthetic leather. I love this stuff (especially the super-cool metallics – they’re so shiny!), it looks great and it’s really easy to cut and sew. There are loads of things you could use this fun faux leather for. Hair clips, bracelets or cuffs, patches, keyrings… you could even use your leftover scraps to add some interesting texture to cards or gift tags.

Today I’m sharing a tutorial for how to make a star headband! Show off the gorgeous metallic faux leather with a star headband! You can add lots of stars to make a super star crown, or just add a couple of stars for a bit of subtle glamour.

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

To make the headband you will need:

* A synthetic leather kit
* A sewing needle
* Sewing scissors
* An air-erasable fabric marker pen or an ordinary felt tip pen
* The headband template sheet – click here to download and print the PDF
* A plastic headband
* Coordinating felt (I used black to match the headband)
* Craft glue
* A glue gun and glue
* A heatproof mat for the glue gun
* Newspaper or scrap paper to protect your workspace

To make the headband:

Use the templates provided to cut out as many stars as you want – I cut one large star and four small stars. Trace the star shapes onto the back of the leather using a pen then cut them out with sewing scissors.

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Cut pieces of felt slightly bigger than each star. Turn the stars over and place them on some newspaper or scrap paper. One by one, cover the back of each star with a layer of craft glue and then firmly press a piece of felt on top covering the star completely. Turn the felt and attached stars over and set them aside to dry.

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Once the glue has completely dried cut away the excess felt, leaving stars which are leather on one side and felt on the other.

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Use a glue gun to stick the stars to a headband. Add a line of glue down the centre of one of the stars, on the felt side. Carefully press the star into position on the headband, holding it in place until the glue has dried enough to stick it firmly. Repeat to add the rest of the stars.

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

IMPORTANT: take care when working with the glue gun as the glue gets very hot! Always place it on a heat-proof mat when not in use, and use newspaper or other scrap paper to protect your workspace. Work slowly, squeezing the gun with care to control the amount of glue you’re using and keeping your fingers out of the way of the hot glue.

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

Vegan leather star headband tutorial

A huge thank you to September Pictures for taking photos for this post (tutorial photos taken by Laura herself) and to Sophia for her excellent modelling!

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Fiona’s reversible bucket hats

With this heat wave, every kid needs a bucket hat! We’ve had Fiona’s two cute hats on display in the shop for the past couple of weeks and have had dozens of offers to buy them. The free Oliver + S reversible bucket hat pattern is a gem – I’ve made it in the past and I recently made one for Harvey but he’s already outgrown it! Time to make another one – and this time I’ll have Fiona’s handy advice. Read on for tips and tricks!

hatsoff

Hello, I’m Fiona and you can find me over on my blog, Poppy Makes. Today I’m telling you all about the hats I made my kids using the free pattern from Oliver + S.

I love bucket hats on kids and always thought they would be really difficult to sew, but with this fantastic pattern and some gorgeous fabric from Annie’s shop, they really weren’t difficult at all! [Editor’s note: Fiona used Asbury by Thomas Knauer and Banksia Bloom by Saffron Craig for her hats]

Picture 1

My children have quite big heads and I decided to make a size large for each. The pattern suggests that you need 1/3 yard of interior and exterior fabric but by arranging the pattern pieces carefully I managed to get away with just ¼ metre cut of each. One pack of interfacing was plenty to make 2 hats, and I used iron-on interfacing rather than sew-in.

As with all Liesl Gibson’s patterns, the pattern is really well written with very clear diagrams for each step.  She advises finger pressing before pressing with an iron and I found that this made it much easier to get a nice finish.

Picture 2

The pattern suggests that to make the brim sturdier, you can topstitch a series of rows around the brim. I decided to do this on the first hat, and although I liked the look I didn’t enjoy all the starting and stopping with each row. On the second hat, instead of rows I topstitched round the edge of the brim and then stitched in a continuous spiral towards the centre. This was much quicker and I think it looks better because there is no backstitching in each row.

Picture 3

Another tip I have is when sewing curves, the more clips you make, the smoother the curve. I find it easier to use small scissors to clip. I find it’s easier to control them so you don’t clip through your stitching line.

Picture 4

>When attaching the cap to the brim I would advise using lots of pins. I find it easier to pin horizontally and then you can just stitch right up to (or right over if you’re brave) each pin.

Picture 5

To finish the hat Liesl suggests hand stitching the interior cap before topstitching. I was lazy and didn’t bother with this step. I just turned a hem, pressed it and then topstitched using the edge of my sewing machine foot as a guide. It worked out fine for me, but I think you would get a neater and more perfect finish if you followed Liesl’s advice and took the time to hand stitch.

Picture 6

I absolutely loved making these hats and my kids adore them. They have already demanded another one each. You could add all sorts of embellishments and personalise them for the special little people to enjoy. I’m tempted to size the pattern up to make one for myself!

Thanks for letting me play with your fabric Annie!

Thank you Fiona!

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Sew a tie!

With Father’s Day around the corner I thought it would be nice to feature a men’s project on our homepage this week (and a quick and easy one at that!)

This cool tie was made using a free pattern by Puking Pastilles that I found on Sew Mama Sew. Even with the hand-stitched finishing, it was done in a couple of hours. And if you pick the right fabric this tie will get a lot of wear – what a fun and satisfying project!

For this tie, I used the Universe Night print from Curious Nature by David Butler. I was also very tempted to use Starcomb Darkwater which I think would look really cool too.

If you want something lighter, I like Showers in blue from Thomas Knauer’s Flock collection. Or if you have a kid-at-heart on your hands, how about one of the Scribbles from Happy Drawings? When you pick out fabric, remember that the tie will be cut on the bias so you have to turn the fabric and imagine how it will look!

My one piece of advice for this pattern is to make the front just a bit narrower – maybe half an inch on each side. It’s pretty wide but that’s easy enough to fix – but don’t over do it! The pieces look huge once you cut them out, but you do need a lot of fabric for those neat folds!

If you make a tie for Father’s Day or any other day, please add your snaps to our Flickr group!

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