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DIY Embroidered Plant Lady brooches tutorial

We are obsessed with Laura Howard‘s latest creation: Plant Lady brooches! Perfect handmade flair to show off your plant lady status or a fabulous gift – Mother’s Day is just around the corner and let’s not forget it! Over to you, Laura…

DIY Embroidered Plant Lady brooches tutorial

Add a bit of plant lady style to your outfits with these fun felt brooches! There’s an embroidered “plant lady” badge, a cute cactus and a massive monstera leaf.

These leafy designs would make great gifts for the plant-lovers in your life. You could also leave off the brooch backs and use the designs as patches to sew on your rucksack, jacket, or other items that don’t need regular washing.

Finished sizes:

Monstera – 3.5″ x 2.75″
Plant Lady – 2.25″ round
Cactus 2.75″ x 2″

Tools & Materials:

The template sheet provided
Evergreen, Grassy Meadows, Chartreuse, Fuchsia, and Cotton Candy wool blend felt
Matching sewing threads
Light green, mid green, dark green, light pink and white embroidery thread (I used DMC 699 for the dark green, DMC 905 for the mid green, DMC 907 for the light green, DMC 603 for the pink, and DMC BLANC for the white.)
Brooch clasps
White tissue paper
A pencil or fine pen
A sewing needle and pins
Sewing scissors or embroidery scissors (these are great for cutting out small shapes!)
Optional: an air erasable fabric marker
DIY Embroidered cactus brooch tutorialTo make a cactus brooch:

Use the templates provided to cut one green cactus from bright green felt, one plant pot from light pink felt, and one heart from bright pink felt.

One by one, sew the shapes to a backing piece of dark green felt. Use whip stitch and matching thread, taking care to sew the bottom edge of the cactus and the top edge of the plant pot flush with each other.

Add the stitched spines to the cactus, sewing lots of single stitches with two strands of white embroidery thread (out of the six strands in the skein).

Cut a small flower from fuchsia felt. You can carefully cut this freehand, or draw a flower on the felt with an air erasable marker pen and cut it out. Sew the flower in position with three strands of light pink embroidery thread, sewing one stitch along each petal as shown.

Trim away the backing felt, leaving a narrow border around the cactus design. Then use the shape you’ve just cut out as a template to cut a matching backing piece from dark green felt.

DIY Embroidered Cactus brooch tutorial

Turn over the backing shape. Sew a brooch clasp in position with a double thickness of matching sewing thread. Place the front and back of the brooch together and sew around the edges with whip stitch and more matching thread.

 

DIY Embroidered Plant Lady brooches tutorialTo make a Plant Lady brooch:

Trace the brooch design onto a piece of white tissue paper, with a sharp pencil or a fine pen. Roughly cut out the design and sew it to a piece of light pink felt with large tacking stitches.

Embroider the lettering and the outlines of the leaves with backstitch, sewing small stitches as you sew around the curves. Use three strands of dark green embroidery thread (from a skein of six strands) for the lettering, and two strands of mid green thread for the leaves.

Remove the tacking stitches and gently tear away the tissue paper, carefully removing any remaining small pieces of paper with a pin.

Fill in the leaves with two strands of light green embroidery thread, as shown.

Trace the circular brooch shape onto a piece of white tissue paper and cut it out. Position this over your stitching so it’s centred and pin it in place. Cut around the circle then unpin and discard the tissue paper.

Place the felt circle on a piece of bright green felt and whip stitch it in position with matching pink sewing thread.

Trim the green felt, leaving a narrow border around the pink circle. Use this shape as a template to cut out a matching backing piece of bright green felt.

DIY Embroidered Plant Lady brooch tutorial

Turn the backing piece over. Sew a brooch clasp in position with a double thickness of matching sewing thread. Place the front and back of the brooch together and sew around the edges with whip stitch and more matching thread.

 

DIY Embroidered monstera brooch tutorialTo make a monstera leaf brooch:

Use the template provided to cut out a monstera leaf from mid green felt. Place it on a piece of light pink felt and sew it in position with whip stitch and matching mid green sewing thread.

Embroider the veins of the leaf, using the photo and the drawing on the template as a guide. Use backstitch and three strands of mid-green embroidery thread (from the six strands in the skein). Start by sewing the central line down the middle of the leaf then add the other lines.

Trim the backing felt, leaving a narrow border of felt around the leaf. Use this shape as a template to cut out a matching backing piece of pink felt.

DIY Embroidered Monstera Brooch tutorial

Turn the backing shape over. Sew a brooch clasp in position with a double thickness of matching sewing thread. Place the front and back of the brooch together and sew around the edges with whip stitch and more matching thread.

Show off your Plant Lady brooches with the hashtag #thevillagehaberdashery so we can see what you make!

DIY Embroidered Plant Lady brooches tutorial

DIY Embroidered Plant Lady brooches tutorial

DIY Embroidered Plant Lady brooches tutorial

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Mod Podge fabric-covered tray tutorial by Chloe Hardisty

We are huge fans of decoupage in the shop and Mod Podge is our product of choice. To inspire you to give this craft a try, we’ve got an awesome DIY by Chloe Hardisty, the designer behind the brand Cotton Clara! We stock Chloe’s fun modern cross stitch banner kits and covet all of the DIY’s on her blog so we are super happy that she deigned this project for The Daily Stitch. Take it away, Chloe!

Mod Podge tray tutorial

I love using Mod Podge to upcycle furniture and other household objects, I’ve transformed cupboards, stools, the possibilities are endless! But if you want to start simple with this technique, this tray project is the perfect place to begin.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

What you will need:

Start by making sure your chosen tray is clean and dry. I got my tray from Wilkos for a couple of pounds. You could use an old tray you have, just be careful if it has a pattern on it, that the pattern doesn’t show through the fabric you’ve chosen.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Now lay you fabric out, wrong side up, and draw around your tray, giving yourself enough extra fabric to wrap around the rim of the tray. I did this freehand but you might want to be a bit more precise with the way you do it. Cut the shape out.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Now coat the tray with a layer of Mod Podge, make sure it’s an even layer, not too thick. Take your fabric piece and lay it over the tray taking care to keep it central so you have an equal width of extra fabric to wrap around the sides.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Smooth the fabric down, working on the edges especially, its useful to use a dry brush to get the fabric right into the edges. As I was working with a round tray, there was always going to be an element of gathering, but get it as neat as you can. If you find the Mod Podge is seeping through the fabric, don’t worry as we’ll be covering the top of the fabric in another layer of mod podge later on.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

At this stage, leave the tray to dry. This should only take an hour or two

Now turn the tray upside down, and cover the underside edges with Mod Podge. Now start to fold the edge of your fabric over, making slits in the edge of the fabric where needed, to allow the fabric to sit neatly. As you go along, you can be adding more Mod Podge to the top of the fabric to try and get it to sit neatly and as close to the tray as possible. Leave this to dry.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Now turn the tray back over so it’s right side is up. Cover the whole tray in another layer of Mod Podge. This will make the tray pretty much water proof, and wipe clean, although be careful, if you leave standing water on the tray, it will mark and damage the surface.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Once this has dried, turn over the tray one last time and give the underside a final coat of Mod Podge to fully seal and stick the edges of fabric down.

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Annie here again: How fun is this tray? What fabric do you want to use?

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Mod Podge tray tutorial

Want to learn the art of decoupage in real life? We have a wonderful class coming up with the artist Gabriela Szulman at our West Hampstead shop and you can find out more about that here.

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A Year of Wreaths: April Felt Flower Wreath by Laura Howard

It’s time for the April wreath in our Year of Wreaths series with Laura Howard! Read on for her beautiful Felt Flower Wreath tutorial and pick up a kit here. Take it away, Laura!

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

This month’s wreath is all about bright and zingy spring colours! The layered felt flowers and embroidered green leaves really pop against a wreath base wrapped in neutral linen-blend fabric. You could easily adapt this design by adding more flowers and leaves, or by using different shades of wool blend felt to change the mood of the wreath. The individual felt flowers would also make great brooches or hair clips.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

You’ll find all the supplies you need in The Village Haberdashery shop – follow the links below for individual items or click here for the April wreath kit.

You will need:
*The template sheet (click here to download and print the PDF)
*A 30cm polystyrene ring wreath base
*Half a metre of Robert Kaufman Essex Yarn Dyed fabric in Flax
*Wool blend felt in the following colours: Chartreuse, Hallows Eve, Cotton Candy and Wisteria
*Co-ordinating embroidery thread in orange, pink and purple
*Sewing scissors
*Embroidery scissors
*Sewing needle and pins
*A glue gun and glue
*A heat-proof mat for the glue gun
*Newspaper to protect your workspace from any glue drips
*Optional: a piece of twine or co-ordinating ribbon for hanging the wreath

To make the wreath:

1. Use the templates provided to cut out the flower and leaf pieces from wool blend felt in Hallows Eve (orange), Candy Floss (pink), Wisteria (purple) and Chartreuse (green).

Cut the flower pieces in the following colours and quantities:

Flower A: 1 x orange, 2 x purple.
Flower B: 1 x pink, 1 x orange.
Flower C: 1 x orange, 2 x pink, 2 x purple.
Flower D: 1 x orange, 1 x pink.
Circle E: 1 x orange, 1 x pink, 1 x purple.
Circle F: 2 x purple.
Circle G: 3 x purple, 1 x orange, 1 x pink.
Circle H: 1 x orange, 1 x pink.

Layer the pieces to assemble seven flowers, using the photos as a guide. Then cut out 24 green leaves: 12 large and 12 small.

Tip: Embroidery scissors are perfect for cutting out fiddly felt shapes!

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

2. Embroider the leaves with half strands of embroidery thread (i.e. for six-stranded embroidery thread, just use three strands). Use three shades of embroidery thread to match the felt flowers (orange, pink and purple), and decorate a third of the leaves with each colour (so, four large and four small leaves for each shade). Sew a line of stitching down the centre of each leaf, finishing your stitching neatly at the back and trimming any excess threads. Use backstitch or sew a line of running stitches then sew back in the opposite direction to fill the gaps and create a continuous line of stitches.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

3. Sew the flowers together with contrasting embroidery thread, as shown. Use half strands of thread, sewing radiating stitches from the centre of each flower. I stitched nine stitches for each of the the larger flowers, and six for the smaller flowers.

Tip: Use the position of the flower petals as a guide when spacing your stitches.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

4. Use the template provided to cut out 25 pieces from the Essex Yarn Dyed fabric for wrapping the wreath base. You may need to cut a few more strips later to finish wrapping the wreath, but it’s better to cut fewer strips to start with than end up wasting fabric!

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

5. Add the fabric strips to the wreath base one by one, using a glue gun to secure the ends at the back of the wreath. Overlap the fabric strips so there are no gaps where the polystyrene base can show through. For each fabric strip, add a dab or two of hot glue to the back of the wreath then carefully press the fabric into position. If required use the template to cut more fabric strips, adding them until the whole base is covered in fabric.

IMPORTANT: take care when working with the glue gun as the glue gets very hot! Always place it on a heat-proof mat when not in use, and use newspaper or other scrap paper to protect your workspace. Work slowly, squeezing the gun with care to control the amount of glue you’re using and keeping your fingers out of the way of the hot glue.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

The wreath base will now look something like this:

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

6. Arrange the felt leaves on the wreath as pictured, covering up the section where you started and finished wrapping the wreath. Start with six small leaves in the centre then add three pairs of large leaves either side, and then a trio of small leaves at each end of the arrangement. Alternate the thread colours, so you get a nice mix of the three shades across the leaves. Pin the leaves in position with one pin towards the bottom end of each leaf. Place the flowers on top to check that you’re happy with the final arrangement, make any adjustments needed then set the flowers aside.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

7. Use the glue gun to attach the leaves to the wreath. Work inwards, holding a leaf back and applying a small dab of glue to the wreath then lightly pressing the outer / top half of the leaf down so it sticks in place. Then remove the pin from the bottom of the leaf and glue the lower half. When you reach the central cluster of leaves, glue all the outer / top halves of the leaves then remove the central pins and glue the inner / bottom halves of the leaves one by one. With the leaves glued in place, the wreath will now look like this:

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

8. Position the flowers on top of the leaves so they overlap as shown, then use the glue gun to glue them in place.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

9. If needed, cut a length of twine or co-ordinating ribbon and knot it securely around the top of the wreath. Use this to hang the wreath in your chosen spot, or just hang the wreath directly onto a hook or nail.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

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Tutorial! Modern macrame plant hanger by Susana Cunha

I was so thrilled to find Susana Cunha, a super talented macrame artist, and add her classes to our schedule! Last November, Susana taught a private class for Caroline, Kym and I in the shop so we could make macrame plant hangers for a future shop window display. It was so fun, easy to learn and quick! You’ll be so delighted with what you can accomplish in just a couple of hours and I can imagine this being a really relaxing craft to unwind with in the evenings, too.

We are so lucky that Susana is sharing her plant hanger tutorial with us on the blog today but if you want to take her class and learn in real life, you can sign up to her next class on 28 January which will teach you how to create a beautiful macrame wall hanging. You can (and should!) also find and follow Susana on Not on the High Street and Instagram.

Traditionally, most of the macrame you see is created using cotton rope or cord which has a beautiful bohemian vibe. For our classes, we’ll use Hoooked Zpagetti t-shirt yarn for the range of colours, accessibility and to give this project a modern spin. Either will work for this tutorial.

Over to you, Susana!

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

This basic plant hanger is an easy introduction to macrame and is suitable for beginners. It features three types of basic decorative knots: Square Knot (SK), Spiral Stitch and Wrapped Knot. Once you’re comfortable with the basics, you can add beads, decorations, or additional knots to add character!

Finished Size: Approximately 115 cm (45 inches) tall, which includes the fringe.

Supplies Needed:

Prep:

  • Cut 6 cords, each 6 meters long
  • Cut 2 cords, 50 cm long

If using cotton rope instead of t-shirt yarn, prepare the tips of the cords to prevent unravelling by using tape. When using tape, compress the tips so they are as narrow as possible.

Method:

Step 1: Pass half of the cords through the metal ring, while holding the ring upright. They should dangle over the bottom of it.
Match the ends of each cord as you pass it through, so it is balanced.

Do the same with the remaining cords, placing them on top of the first group.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
Start a Wrapped Knot tying an Overhand knot at one end of a 50 cm cord. Secure it next to the ring.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
Wrap the long portion around the cords on the ring several times. Make sure you wrap firmly, until the knot is 3 or 4 cm long.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
Pass what’s left of the long portion through the folded area, which looks like a loop.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
Pull the secured end, which has the Overhand knot. The fold and the other end will be pulled inside the bottom of the Wrapped knot. Make sure you pull it half way through the knot.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
Cut off the excess material from each end of the cord used to make the Wrapped Knot. Be careful not to cut the long cords on the ring. Tuck the stubs inside the knot so they can’t be seen.

Divide the cords into groups of 4. Bundle each group by wrapping all 4 cords around your hand several times. Secure with a rubber band.

Step 2: Mentally number the four cords in one group. The fillers are 2 – 3, and the working cords are 1 and 4.
Tie the first Square Knot as shown below.

Move cord 1 to the right, over cords 2 – 3 and under cord 4.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

Move cord 4 to the left, under cords 2 – 3 and over cord 1. Tighten firmly.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

Cords 1 and 4 have switched places, so the direction is reversed for the second half of the Square Knot:

Move cord 1 to the left, over cords 2 – 3 and under cord 4.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

Move cord 4 to the right, under cords 2 – 3 and over cord 1. Tighten firmly.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
Continue tying Square Knots to create a sennit. Push the knots close together as you progress. Tighten each knot firmly. Stop when you have completed 10 square knots.

Repeat step 2 with the remaining groups of four cords.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

Step 3: Measure 10cm after the last square knot on the sennit of one of the groups of four cords. We can now start tying a series of half square knots to create a spiral.

Half Knot

Move working cord 1 to the right, over the fillers (2 and 3) and under working cord 4.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

Move working cord 4 to the left, under the fillers and over working cord 1.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
When making the Spiral Stitch for your Basic Plant Hanger, the cord will naturally start twisting once you tie the first 5 Half knots; hold the fillers steady and keep tying half knots.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn
Step 4: Create a Spiral Stitch design by tying 12 Half Knots as described above. Stop when the sennit is made of 12 Half Knots.

Step 5: Measure 10cm after the last half square knot on the spiral of one of the cords you have been working on and start trying more half knots to create a further spiral.

Step 6: Repeat steps 3 – 5 for each group of cords bundled in step 1.

Cradle

Now you will make the Cradle at the bottom of the Basic Plant Hanger. Measure the plant pot, and find the halfway point by dividing the total height by 2. So if the pot is 6 inches tall, the measurement will be 3 inches.

basic-measure2-large
Locate two sennits that rest next to each other, and secure them. Make sure they are not twisted. Mentally re-number the cords in each sennit 1 – 4.

Step 7: Alternate by selecting cords 3 and 4 from the left sennit, combined with cords 1 and 2 from the right sennit.
Measure from the last SK of one sennit down to the measurement you just calculated for the halfway point on the pot. Tie one Square Knot at that point.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

Step 8: Repeat step 7 using the remaining cords. This is much easier if you suspend the Basic Plant Hanger by the ring at the top.
Make sure the sennits are not twisted, and that you are combining cords from two sennits that rest next to each other.

Step 9: You now need to alternate the cords again, as described in Step 7. Start by mentally re-numbering the cords coming from two sets of SK tied in the previous step. Measure from the bottom of the SK tied in step 7, down the same measurement. This way the next knot rests at the lower edge of the pot. Repeat using the remaining cords.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

Step 10: Measure the bottom of the pot, from the edge to the centre (1/2 the bottom area).

basic-measure3-large

Step 11: Tie a Wrapped Knot (as you did in step 1) around all the cords where you measured the centre of the pot to be.
After tightening it, place the pot in the Cradle. The knot should rest in the centre of the pot. Make adjustments as needed.

Important: Pull on each cord to eliminate any space between the Wrapped Knot and the SK.

Finishing Touches

Cut off the excess material from the cord used to make the Wrapped knot, and tuck the stubs inside so they can’t be seen.

Step 12: Trim the ends of all the cords so they are even. For other materials, you have the option of tying finishing knots, or to, if you’re using cord, unravel and brush to create a brushed fringe for your plant hanger.

Modern Macrame Plant Hanger Tutorial with T-Shirt Yarn

 

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Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Several months ago I was wandering around an Anthropologie when I saw these awesome neon trimmed chambray oven gloves.

Oven Gloves from Anthropologie

I instagrammed them and then filed the idea away in the back of my mind as one I could share with you as a DIY, since we totally have all the supplies! So, I give you a tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves!

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Supplies:

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

First, you’re going to want to make a pattern with one of your existing oven gloves. Look how well-loved my Cath Kidston glove is!  Make sure to either trace with a half-inch seam allowance or plan to trace the seam allowance onto your fabric.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Cut 1 1/2 inch bias strips from your neon fat quarter. You’ll need about a metre to a metre and a half of bias (I’m guesstimating since I made these ages ago and didn’t measure!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sandwich your wadding in between your fabric. We’re going to quilt the whole thing and then cut our pieces out afterward. If you want to avoid wasting fabric, use your pattern as a guide to what you’ll need and cut your pieces close to size.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Now grab your ruler and a marking pencil (I used a pink chaco liner pen – love these!) and draw your stitching lines an inch apart on the top fabric.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

I was originally going to do a grid, but once I saw how cool the lines looked stitched in just one direction I left it simple. (Design choice not just laziness, obviously!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Quilt your fabric sandwich.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

And use your pattern to cut your pieces out of your quilted fabric – one for each side of each glove (so four pieces if you’re making a set of two.)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sew two pieces together with the 1/2″ seam allowance.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Snip as close as possible to the stitching line between the thumb and hand.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Finish the raw edges with an overlocker, zig-zag stitch or pinking shears. To avoid bulk in the thumb, either trim away excess seam allowance before finishing or just try to get in close to your seam when you overlock/pink.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sew the little bias tape tab that’s going to stick off of your glove by making a three-inch tube and turning it inside out or just pressing the raw edges in and edge stitching it (like me).

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Turn your glove inside out, using a point turner to get the fiddly bits if necessary. Enclose the raw edges at the glove’s opening in bias, pin and machine stitch.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Fold the tab and pin the raw edges under the bias wherever you want it on the glove. Machine stitch the bias all the way around (I did a sloppy job on mine as you can see in this picture. Don’t rush!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

And ta da! You have awesome oven gloves to give as a gift or keep for yourself and brighten up your own kitchen!

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Aren’t they fun?

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

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