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A Year of Wreaths: April Felt Flower Wreath by Laura Howard

It’s time for the April wreath in our Year of Wreaths series with Laura Howard! Read on for her beautiful Felt Flower Wreath tutorial and pick up a kit here. Take it away, Laura!

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

This month’s wreath is all about bright and zingy spring colours! The layered felt flowers and embroidered green leaves really pop against a wreath base wrapped in neutral linen-blend fabric. You could easily adapt this design by adding more flowers and leaves, or by using different shades of wool blend felt to change the mood of the wreath. The individual felt flowers would also make great brooches or hair clips.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

You’ll find all the supplies you need in The Village Haberdashery shop – follow the links below for individual items or click here for the April wreath kit.

You will need:
*The template sheet (click here to download and print the PDF)
*A 30cm polystyrene ring wreath base
*Half a metre of Robert Kaufman Essex Yarn Dyed fabric in Flax
*Wool blend felt in the following colours: Chartreuse, Hallows Eve, Cotton Candy and Wisteria
*Co-ordinating embroidery thread in orange, pink and purple
*Sewing scissors
*Embroidery scissors
*Sewing needle and pins
*A glue gun and glue
*A heat-proof mat for the glue gun
*Newspaper to protect your workspace from any glue drips
*Optional: a piece of twine or co-ordinating ribbon for hanging the wreath

To make the wreath:

1. Use the templates provided to cut out the flower and leaf pieces from wool blend felt in Hallows Eve (orange), Candy Floss (pink), Wisteria (purple) and Chartreuse (green).

Cut the flower pieces in the following colours and quantities:

Flower A: 1 x orange, 2 x purple.
Flower B: 1 x pink, 1 x orange.
Flower C: 1 x orange, 2 x pink, 2 x purple.
Flower D: 1 x orange, 1 x pink.
Circle E: 1 x orange, 1 x pink, 1 x purple.
Circle F: 2 x purple.
Circle G: 3 x purple, 1 x orange, 1 x pink.
Circle H: 1 x orange, 1 x pink.

Layer the pieces to assemble seven flowers, using the photos as a guide. Then cut out 24 green leaves: 12 large and 12 small.

Tip: Embroidery scissors are perfect for cutting out fiddly felt shapes!

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

2. Embroider the leaves with half strands of embroidery thread (i.e. for six-stranded embroidery thread, just use three strands). Use three shades of embroidery thread to match the felt flowers (orange, pink and purple), and decorate a third of the leaves with each colour (so, four large and four small leaves for each shade). Sew a line of stitching down the centre of each leaf, finishing your stitching neatly at the back and trimming any excess threads. Use backstitch or sew a line of running stitches then sew back in the opposite direction to fill the gaps and create a continuous line of stitches.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

3. Sew the flowers together with contrasting embroidery thread, as shown. Use half strands of thread, sewing radiating stitches from the centre of each flower. I stitched nine stitches for each of the the larger flowers, and six for the smaller flowers.

Tip: Use the position of the flower petals as a guide when spacing your stitches.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

4. Use the template provided to cut out 25 pieces from the Essex Yarn Dyed fabric for wrapping the wreath base. You may need to cut a few more strips later to finish wrapping the wreath, but it’s better to cut fewer strips to start with than end up wasting fabric!

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

5. Add the fabric strips to the wreath base one by one, using a glue gun to secure the ends at the back of the wreath. Overlap the fabric strips so there are no gaps where the polystyrene base can show through. For each fabric strip, add a dab or two of hot glue to the back of the wreath then carefully press the fabric into position. If required use the template to cut more fabric strips, adding them until the whole base is covered in fabric.

IMPORTANT: take care when working with the glue gun as the glue gets very hot! Always place it on a heat-proof mat when not in use, and use newspaper or other scrap paper to protect your workspace. Work slowly, squeezing the gun with care to control the amount of glue you’re using and keeping your fingers out of the way of the hot glue.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

The wreath base will now look something like this:

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

6. Arrange the felt leaves on the wreath as pictured, covering up the section where you started and finished wrapping the wreath. Start with six small leaves in the centre then add three pairs of large leaves either side, and then a trio of small leaves at each end of the arrangement. Alternate the thread colours, so you get a nice mix of the three shades across the leaves. Pin the leaves in position with one pin towards the bottom end of each leaf. Place the flowers on top to check that you’re happy with the final arrangement, make any adjustments needed then set the flowers aside.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

7. Use the glue gun to attach the leaves to the wreath. Work inwards, holding a leaf back and applying a small dab of glue to the wreath then lightly pressing the outer / top half of the leaf down so it sticks in place. Then remove the pin from the bottom of the leaf and glue the lower half. When you reach the central cluster of leaves, glue all the outer / top halves of the leaves then remove the central pins and glue the inner / bottom halves of the leaves one by one. With the leaves glued in place, the wreath will now look like this:

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

8. Position the flowers on top of the leaves so they overlap as shown, then use the glue gun to glue them in place.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

9. If needed, cut a length of twine or co-ordinating ribbon and knot it securely around the top of the wreath. Use this to hang the wreath in your chosen spot, or just hang the wreath directly onto a hook or nail.

Felt Flower Wreath Tutorial by Laura Howard

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Kym’s Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

When the insanely adorable Thicket collection by Gingiber (Stacie Bloomfield) arrived in the shop I just knew we needed samples because it’s so hard to see their cuteness potential on the bolt. Kym whipped these up in no time, but the bolt of Large Critter Panels she used sold just as fast! We’re sharing this tutorial because you can still make darling cuddly critters with the Little Critter Panel or apply this tutorial to any other soft toy project your heart desires. Take it away, Kym!

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

These new Critter Panels are so sweet! And they make it super simple to make soft toys. This project is perfect for beginners and a nice quick make for a more experiences sewist. Here is a quick tutorial for you sharing my method…

You will need:
*The Critter Panel animal of your choice. I’ve started with the fox.
*A fat quarter of fabric to use as the ckcking, I chose Thicket – Dashes in Black and Natural
*A water soluble pen or another method of drawing lines on your fabric
*Toy Filling
*General sewing supplies: Fabric scissors, Pins, Sewing Machine, Iron, Hand sewing needle, Coordinating thread.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Start by giving your fabric a quick press to eliminate any annoying creases. Then working on the wrong side of your animal panel and using a water soluble pen, draw a line marking your finished size and shape. This is the stitching line. Be sure to test your pen first to make sure it rubs out!

When you are happy with the shape, draw another line about half an inch away on the outside of this line. This is the cut line. Your panel should now look like this…

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Cut around the outside line.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Place your backing fabric right side up and then lay your cut out animal on top right side down. Pin the two layers together and cut around the shape.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Starting at the bottom left side of your panel stitch around your stitching line using a straight stitch. You may find it easier to reduce the stitch length on the tighter corners.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Stop stitching at the bottom right side of the panel so there is a gap of about 4inches for turning and stuffing (see picture below, the gap is between the two pins). Make sure you back/lock stitch at both ends to prevent your stitches from coming loose when stuffing.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Trim down the seam allowance to reduce bulk and clip into the tighter curves to help give a flat finish when turning. You may wish to turn it to the right side first to see which corners need to be clipped.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Snip off any loose threads and turn your soft toy to the right side. A point turner like the one I’m using from Merchant & Mills or a chunky knitting needle may be helpful here.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial\ Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Give the seams a press and press the seam allowances on the gap so they sit inside the toy. Fill with toy filling, making sure to push the stuffing into any awkward corners first before filling up the body. Again a knitting needle may help here.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Sew up the hole by hand using Ladder Stitch.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

When you get to the end of the hole finish the thread by tying a loop knot and then pass the needle through close to the knot, pushing it through the toy so it comes out in a totally different place. Pull the thread through and cut close to where it exits and it will pop back inside and secure your stitches further. Remove any visible pen lines with a damp cloth.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

Give your toy a plump up like a cushion and you’re done! I also made the Bear Critter to keep Mr Fox company in the shop!

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

These lovely creatures could be used as soft toys or cushions. Or why not add a weight to the inside of the bottom and use them as a door stop! You could also add embellishments in embroidery, beads, ribbons or anything you fancy to personalise your Critter.

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

I can’t wait to see what you make with these cuties! Share your makes with #thevillagehaberdashery and #tvhhaul!

Thicket cuddly critter tutorial

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Zoe’s Oliver + S Hopscotch Skirt pattern hack tutorial

This is a guest post by Zoe Edwards of So Zo What do you Know? She is a prolific sewing blogger, a teacher at our shop, a busy baby mama, a pattern designer and creator of Me Made May, among many other things! Find her on IG @sozoblog

If you’re interested in sewing clothing for little girls and haven’t come across the Oliver + S Hopscotch pattern, then allow me to introduce you! The skirt, in particular, is a wonderful, timeless garment that has perfect proportions and great details. However, it only really works in solid fabrics or prints with a small-scale design. The skirt’s button placket and clever pleated pockets would most likely chew up a larger design of print. But wait! I have the answer: an incredibly simple pattern hack that turns the Hopscotch skirt pattern into the ideal canvas for fabric with a bold print. We’re going to ignore the pockets and omit the button stand.

Zoe's Oliver + S Hopscotch Skirt pattern hack tutorial

In fact, I may be cheeky even alluding to this as a pattern hack. Because we’re not actually going to alter the pattern pieces at all: we’re just going to use them slightly differently and alter the construction method a tad. Aside from the being able to now use this pattern for a wider range of fabric designs, it also pretty much halves the construction time! Which may appeal to you, whether you’re creating wardrobe staples for your little girl, or whipping up a cute gift for someone else’s!

Hopscotch Pattern by Oliver + S

You will need:

*Oliver + S Hopscotch sewing pattern
*Fabric (I used about 50cm of Umbrellas in Citrus to make size 3T, more may be required for larger sizes, narrower fabric or larger repeat designs)
*Thread
*3/4″ or 20mm wide elastic

Trace the pattern pieces in the size that you require to preserve the other sizes for future projects. For this hacked version of the pattern, you will only need the front skirt piece, back skirt piece and front waistband piece.

Zoe's Oliver + S Hopscotch Skirt pattern hack tutorial

When positioning the pieces on your fabric, ignore the ‘cut 2’ direction on the front skirt piece and front waistband piece. Instead, position these two pieces on a fold (like the back skirt piece) as pictured above. You’ll need to trust me on this: the dimensions of these pattern pieces mean that, even though you are using them on the fold and omitting the button stand, the measurements of the finished skirt will remain the same as if you made the regular version of this skirt pattern.

Once you have cut out the pieces, snip a tiny notch at the centre fold on the bottom edge of the front waistband piece, and another tiny notch at the centre front fold at the top edge of the front skirt piece. These notches will be matched up during construction.

Zoe's Oliver + S Hopscotch Skirt pattern hack tutorial

The main difference in the construction of this hacked version is that you will now be making one front skirt panel (see above), rather than two. Gather the top edge of the front skirt piece and apply it to the front waistband piece, and continue the construction as per the rest of the instructions.

Zoe's Oliver + S Hopscotch Skirt pattern hack tutorial

Congratulations! You have made the ideal gathered skirt, AND saved yourself some precious sewing time. Now, stop being so selfless and get back to making something for you!

Thank you, Zoe!

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Tutorial! Sara’s Mendocino fish quilt block

We sent Sara a bundle of Mendocino a few months ago with the task of creating a quilt for a window display in our West Hampstead shop (we’ll share the new window next week!) Sara previously made this gorgeous Tiger Lily quilt so we couldn’t wait to see what she’d make with the latest Heather Ross collection. Needless to say, we were not disappointed. This quilt is a stunner!

Sara is back today on The Daily Stitch to show us how to whip up those awesome fish blocks! Take it away, Sara!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

I was so inspired by all of the amazing makes with Mendocino at Quilt Market, especially the fantastic octopus and seahorse quilts (check them out in Annie’s Quilt Market report). In the same vibe, I decided to make a shoal of fish swimming amongst the mermaids and octopi.

Materials

For the fish blocks, I used:

  • 19 FQ from Mendocino for the main bodies of the fish in the pink-brown-orange colourways (I repeated three to make 22 fish) – there was lots left over
  • 1m of Kona in Aqua for the fish backgrounds

For the quilt background, I used:

¼ inch seam is used throughout. The finished quilt measures approximately 45×55 inches.

Cutting

For each fish block, cut the following, using the template. I traced this onto template plastic to help with fussy cutting.

From main fabric:

1 x fish body piece

1 x fish tail piece

From background fabric:

2 x fish body background piece

2 x fish tail background piece

1 x fish tail end piece

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Piecing

1. Take the main body piece and the two body background pieces, fold them in half lengthways and finger press the centre line. For the background pieces, you should be matching the end points of the curve, rather than the ends of the fabric.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Place the body piece on top of one of the background pieces, right sides together, with the centre creases matching.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

2. Match each end point of the fish body piece with the end of the curve on the background piece and pin. Find the mid point between the centre pin and each end pin and pin here, too. You can finger press another crease between the end and the centre crease to make sure that this is accurate, but I don’t bother with this part. The pinned piece will look full of folds, but it will come together, I promise!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

3. Start stitching the pieces together at one end. The trick is to go slowly and stop frequently to check that the edges are still aligned and to move excess fabric from one side to the other, to ensure that it doesn’t get caught in the needle. I find that it helps to hold the fabrics up at an angle with my left hand whilst sewing. The important thing is not to stretch the fabric to try to make it fit the curve – this will cause a misshapen finished block that won’t lie flat. Press the seam towards the background fabric.

4. Take your second body background piece, making sure that you have the longer sides matching, and align and pin the centre creases, right sides together.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

This time you need the background piece to overlap your existing seam by ¼ inch.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

5. Pin and sew in the same way as for the first seam, lifting the fabric up slightly with your left hand if that makes things easier.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

6. Press the seam towards the background fabric again. You should have something that looks a bit like this – but I must confess that I pressed one of the seams the wrong way in this block, so it looks slightly different!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

7. You will notice that there is a smaller amount of background fabric at one end of your block. Line up your ruler so that one line cuts through the two points of the fish body, and trim this end down to just under ¼ inch from the end of the fish.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

8. Now we’ll piece the tail. Take the main tail piece and the two background tail pieces and make the centre creases as you did for the body.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

9. Pin the centre crease and each end, overlapping the background piece at the point of the tail (where it will join the body) by ¼ inch.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

10. Sew the seam with the same method you used for the body, and press the seam towards the background fabric. You should have something that looks like this.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

11. Pin your second tail background piece in the same way, ensuring that it overlaps by ¼ inch at the point of the tail.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Sew and press seams towards the background fabric.

12. Take your tail end piece and fold it so that the two ends of the curve match. Finger press a crease at the centre of the curve, and in the centre of the curve of your main tail piece. Match and pin the centre creases.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

13. Pin the ends of each curve as you did for the body and tail pieces. Take the straight edge pieces and shift these so that they are at 90 degrees to the main tail background pieces. It will look something like this, but ignore the fact that I had got ahead of myself and already sewed the tail to the body in this photo!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

14. Sew the tail end seam, stopping with the needle down when you get to the beginning of the the curve and rotating the fabric to keep your ¼ inch seam allowance. Sew the curve in exactly the same way as for the body and the tail, stopping again when you get to the end of the curve and rotating to sew the final straight seam. Press towards the background fabric.

15. Trim the little triangles of fabric at the point of the tail so that you have a straight edge. Try to ensure that you have one of the lines of the ruler cutting through the centre of the tail so that you have a 90 degree angle, and keep the seam allowance as close to ¼ inch as you can (it will be slightly smaller, which you want).

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

16. Line up the trimmed ends of the tail and body pieces and pin. To make sure that the tail and the body meet in the right place, I put a pin through the point of the tail piece and then put this through the point of the body piece.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Sew and press this final seam.

17. Finally, trim your block. How much you need to trim depends on what size you want your block to be. There is quite a lot of extra fabric on all sides, so that I could be flexible in this stage. I trimmed the bare minimum, just to ensure that the block was squared up.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Finishing the quilt

To make the quilt top, I pieced 22 fish blocks together improvisationally, inserting extra pieces of background fabric to give the shoal movement. The quilt background is simply pieced from 6.5” blocks in a mixure of Kona Aqua, four blue Mendocino prints, and a few 9-patch blocks randomly pieced in Kona Aqua, Azure and Bahama Blue in order to create a dappled effect.

I quilted using wavy lines and used leftovers from the pink prints for the binding.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

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Caroline’s plush rainbow ribbon baby toy tutorial

This baby toy is colourful and cosy, squishy and crinkly and covered in ribbons to entertain! We are absolutely thrilled with it and I can’t wait to share the tutorial Caroline created to make this!

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Supplies:

* Two 7″ square pieces of Rainbow Plush Jersey – you can get plenty out of the half metre minimum we sell!
* Ribbon scraps – at least nine 5″ pieces
* Coordinating thread
* Double sided basting tape (optional)
* Thick foil wrapper (optional)

Sewing:

Fold ribbons in half and pin them about an inch apart to the front of the fabric with 1/2″ hanging over the edge.

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Sew the ribbons to the top fabric with a half inch seam allowance.

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Lay the plush side of the bottom fabric on top of the rainbow fabric. Remember that for this project we are using the plush (wrong side of the fabric) for the back side of the toy.

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

If you’d like to add a crinkly wrapper, this is the step. The wrapper adds a sound effect to the toy. I’m using the wrapper from some dog treats! Easy to find and effective.

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Sew right sides together all around the square at 1/2” from the edge, leaving a gap of 3” for the flip.

Tip: Because this fabric will slide when you sew, you can use double sided basting tape to hold the two layers. Do not put tape on the gap that you will use to flip the square inside out.

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Cut the corners off.

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Leave pin or two on the wrapper to hold it in place and carefully turn it to the right side.

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Remove the pins from the foil and use a knitting needle or point turner to push out the corners. Hand sew the gap to finish and you’re done!

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Here are pictures of the finished toy!

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Ready, set and play!!!!

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

Plush rainbow ribbon toy tutorial

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Super fast knitted jacquard cowl

Quick cowls are my jam and this one is the jammiest! Echino Knitted Jacquards are a narrow 75cm wide and feel like a soft jumper so they are perfect for this project. Just 150cm of fabric and two seams (a little hand sewing to finish) and you’ll be wearing the cosiest cowl ever!

Free tutorial for easy knitted jacquard cowl

This cowl is basically a long tube and you’ll be able to wrap it around your neck twice with a little space. If you want it closer-fitting, maybe cut your fabric to 140cm long. I would probably do that if I made another one, but it totally works this length and a lot of people prefer even more breathing room. It’s totally personal preference here!

You’ll need:

Echino Knitted Jacquard

Fold fabric right sides together lengthwise and sew into a tube with a 1/2″ seam allowance. I used a narrow zig-zag stitch to give the seam a little stretch.

There are no tricks to sewing with this fabric. Knitted jacquard is obviously a knit fabric, but I didn’t take any other precautionary measures for sewing with knits than the zig zag stitch. I just used the needle that was already in the machine (gah – don’t judge!) and a regular foot and I didn’t have any issues at all.

Free tutorial for easy knitted jacquard cowl

Give that seam a press.

Free tutorial for easy knitted jacquard cowl

Turn that tube you made right side out and pin the ends right sides together at the seam you just sewed.

Free tutorial for easy knitted jacquard cowl

Starting about two inches back from the seam, sew right sides together with a 1/2″ seam allowance.

Free tutorial for easy knitted jacquard cowl

Keep going as far as you can, moving the fabric out of the way and being careful not to pull or stretch it as it feeds through the machine.

Free tutorial for easy knitted jacquard cowl

When you can’t sew any further, pull it off your machine and you’ll have about a four inch gap in the seam that looks like this.

Free tutorial for easy knitted jacquard cowl

No one will ever see that but you and the ends don’t fray, but the proper thing to do is to hand sew it. But I mean, it’s totally fine if you want to wear it right now and finish it later. Like I said, no one will see!

If you make this, or any of the projects featured on The Daily Stitch, please do share them on Instagram and tag them #tvhhaul! We love to see your makes and you could win Stash Points!

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Free pattern and tutorial: Emmajané’s Arrows Quilt

We’re thrilled to have a new free pattern for you today from Emmajané of Stitch and Pieces. Her lovely new Arrows Quilt is now gracing the new window display at our West Hampstead shop. When we posted a sneak peak on Instagram, you guys went wild for this quilt, so I know you’re going to be exited to get your hands on this pattern! Take it away, Emmajané!

IMG_0163

I love half rectangle triangles and I have found a way of creating them without use of fancy rulers. This quilt uses half rectangle triangles and rectangles to create arrows.

Fabric Requirements:

*24 fat quarters (the list of the Kona Cotton Solids I used is given later in the cutting instructions)
*300cm of fabric for the backing and border
*50cm of fabric for the binding
*I used a double size piece of wadding, which is 96” x 93”

Recommended tools:

*Quilter’s ruler
*Fabric pen

Notes:

Finished quilt size 60” x 82”.

Seam allowance is ¼” throughout.

When making the half rectangle triangles press the lighter fabric seam over the darker fabric seam.

WOF refers to width of fabric.

Cutting and Preparation:

Cut the following fabrics to create 6” x 4” rectangles. The letters in brackets indicate what the fabrics will be referred to afterwards in the cutting instructions and in the pattern. The number at the side tells you how many 6” x 4” rectangles to cut. These will be used to create the half rectangle triangles.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Cut the following fabrics to create 5” x 3” rectangles.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Cut the following fabrics to create 5” x 1¾” rectangles. These will be the small rectangles at the beginning and end of the rectangle rows.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

You need to cut 7 strips 3” x WOF for the border of the quilt. (I used the same as my backing, Plum).

You will also need to cut 7 strips 2½” x WOF for the binding. (I used Shadow).

Making the Half Rectangle Triangles (HRT):

There are two types of half rectangle triangle blocks to make. For ease these are going to be called 1 or 2.

HRT 1 uses Fabrics A and B. This is how the finished block is finished:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

To make the HRT 1:

Take the two of the 6” x 4” rectangles from the correct colours. These will be called Fabric A and Fabric B. The fabric which will be on the left hand side will be right side up (here this is grey) and the fabric which will be on the right hand side will be wrong side up (here this is pink).

Then using the half inch mark on your quilter’s ruler, with a fabric pen mark a half inch on the grey fabric in the bottom left corner and top right corner. Mark a half inch on the pink fabric in the in the top left corner and bottom right corner. Then still using the fabric marker, join the dots with the quilter’s ruler.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Now place the wrong side fabric on top of the right side fabric, taking care to match the dots and line with one another.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Pin and then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Using your rotary cutter, cut down the line.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Press the two blocks, ready to trim

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

This is where it gets tricky! You are going to trim these blocks to create a 5” x 3” block, but in order to get points that are perfect when you start sewing blocks together you need to cut accurately.

It’s best to trim the shorter sides first. Make sure that there is enough fabric to cut a 5” side, but make sure that ⅛” is in the bottom fabric.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Check that at the other side you have the angle at the correct point so that you get ⅛” of the other fabric there as well.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

When you then trim the longer 5” edge you need to make sure that there is ⅛” of each fabric included in your trimming. It’s a bit fiddly, but you will get the hang of it.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Done correctly your block should look like this:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

It does look like you’ve gone wrong because there is a blunt point, but you are going to need it like that for later (trust me).

This table shows you the combinations to pair together to make the HRT 1 blocks:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Once you’ve got the hang of this, making the HRT 2 should be straightforward, but here are some photos and an explanation to help out:

Making HRT 2:

HRT 2 uses Fabrics C and D. This is how the finished block is finished:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

This time our wrong side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the bottom left and top right. The right side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the top left and bottom right. Like before draw a line using a fabric pen on both fabrics to join the dots.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Match the lines as before and pin. Then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line. Then use the rotary cutter to create the two blocks.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Once again, press the seams and get ready for the tricky business of trimming!

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Use the same technique as before. Make sure you trim with a ⅛” as you did previously.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

This table shows you the combinations to pair together to make the HRT 2 blocks:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

The hard work is now done! It’s time to get piecing this quilt. Starting from top to bottom the pieces need sewing together like this:

Row 1

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 2

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 3

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

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Emmajané's Arrows Quilt tutorial

Once all the pieces have been sewn into rows, sew the rows together as you would with any other quilt. I then sewed my border strips together and sewed these around the arrows section.

It’s now time to press the quilt top really well and remove any loose threads.

Basting and Quilting:

Make the quilt sandwich, using your preferred method. Quilt as desired. I quilted each of the arrows with my walking foot. I quilted the arrows in threads to match the fabric colour.

Trim the quilt in preparation for attaching the binding.

Binding:

Sew the seven strips together. Fold in half and press. Attach using a ¼” foot and then either hand or machine finish.

Thank you, Emmajane!

Comments { 3 }

How to shorten a zip

We get a lot of questions about shortening zippers in the shop. It’s one of those things that seems scary or like you’re breaking the rules, but is actually totally easy and a great thing to know how to do – so you can use any length of zip for a project if you don’t have the size a pattern calls for (as long as it’s not way too short, obviously!) Zoe Edwards is here to walk us through this handy technique. Thanks, Zoe!

How to shorten a zipper

The ability to shorten a zip is a very useful skill to have in your sewing-bag of tricks. Often a student will arrive at a class I’m teaching all stressed out because they couldn’t find the exact length zip that a sewing pattern called for, in the right colour for their project. My advice is always this: focus on finding a zip that is a great colour match for your chosen fabric. If the zip is a couple of inches too small, it’ll still probably be fine for your project, and if it’s too big then it can easily be shortened. If you type in ‘How to shorten a zip/zipper’ into YouTube, you’ll find heaps of videos on the subject. However, here is the method that I prefer…

Please note: this tutorial is for shortening regular or invisible/concealed zips with nylon teeth, not metal ones.

How to shorten a zipper

Step 1: Find out how much shorter you want your zip to be.

How to shorten a zipper

Step 2: Place a pin where you want the new stopper to be. Alternatively, you could mark the zip tape with chalk or a marker pen.

How to shorten a zipper

Step 3: Put a strong needle in your sewing machine (I like to use a 90/14 needle for this process). Position the zip underneath your presser foot so that the needle is directly above the pin that you placed in the zip tape. Lower the presser foot so that the zip tape is clamped down and remove the pin.

How to shorten a zipper

Step 4: Slowly sew across the zip tape from one side to the other. It may feel a bit weird to do this, so use the hand wheel rather than the foot pedal if sewing over the zip teeth is freaking you out. But don’t worry, your needle is extremely unlikely to break!

How to shorten a zipper

Step 5: When you reach the other side of the zip tape, make sure the needle is piercing the zip tape (use the hand wheel if necessary). Then lift the presser foot, spin the zip round 180 degrees , lower the presser foot again and stitch back over the row of stitching. Do this three or four times to create a strong new zip stopper.

How to shorten a zipper

Step 6: Remove the zip from your sewing machine and snip away any loose threads.

How to shorten a zipper

Step 7: Measure ½” below your new zip stopper and cut the excess away.

How to shorten a zipper

Step 8: Most zip shortening tutorials stop at this point, but I like to seal the bottom of the zip tape to prevent it from fraying. Quickly pass the cut edge through the flame of a lighter. I’m sure this goes without saying, but please take care using a lighter!

How to shorten a zipper

Done! A freshly shortened zip to your exact specifications, that won’t fray in the wash!

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Tutorial! Quick charm pack party bunting

Here is a fun idea we came up with this week: charm pack bunting! Quick and simple and a great way to use those fun fabrics you just had to have so you grabbed a charm pack. Let’s get started!

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

Supplies:

One charm pack for about three metres of bunting
Three metres of bias binding per charm pack (plus extra if you want long ties)
Coordinating thread

Cutting:

1. Find something round to trace and mark where you need to trim off the corners of each square.

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

2. Trim off the corners

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

Sewing the flags:

3. Put the pieces in pairs. I chose to arrange them so each bunting flag would be different on the reverse.

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

4. Put each pair right sides together.

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

5. Sew with about a 1/4 inch seam allowance.

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

6. Trim the curves, turn right side out and press each flag.

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

Assembling the bunting:

7. Arrange in the order you like. I just didn’t want two of the same next to each other, but otherwise tried to keep it pretty random. Don’t forget to check the opposite sides to make sure you’re happy with that arrangement too!

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

8. Fold your bias in half and sew together, leaving about 7 inches free before adding your first flag.Capture the raw edge inside the bias, reversing at the start and finish of each flag. Leave about 1/2 to 3/4 an inch between each flag (I just eyeballed it). Try not to stretch the bias as you sew.

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

9. Give your bunting a final press and you’re ready to party!

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

 

Charm pack bunting tutorial from The Village Haberdashery

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Vicky’s Zip-Top Purse tutorial

Today we have a fun tutorial from Vicky of FrosterleyBazaar for a cute zip-top purse! This little bag is perfect for storing essentials and running out the door (I could totally hang this on a buggy hook!) or for tossing in your massive tote and finding easily (this is totally me!) Stitch it up in any fabric you love or bust your scraps and create a patchwork exterior. Fun! Over to you, Vicky!

Zip-Top Purse Tutorial on The Daily Stitch

Here is a sweet little purse for whatever bits and bobs you need to keep together. Inside are two pockets, one zipped and one open. The end panels allow the purse to open really wide so you can easily see what’s inside, while a curved top zip keep everything secure.

Zip-top purse tutorial on The Daily Stitch

Zip-top purse tutorial on The Daily Stitch

Sewing supplies:

  • Purse outer fabric – linen is good, or you can create fabric by piecing
  • Medium weight fusible interfacing
  • Lining fabric – quilting weight cotton or voile work nicely
  • Binding fabric – quilting weight cotton
  • Short zip, at least 18 cm
  • Long zip, at least 40cm

Construction method: this purse is constructed with the lining and outer sewn at the same time. You won’t need to make a separate lining. Seam allowances are on the outside, and binding is applied to finish the seams; you can choose whether this binding blends with your outer fabric or contrasts with it – there are also plenty of opportunities to make this purse your own by choosing different fabric for the end panels, different colour zips, different front decoration, etc. Go wild!

Step 1: Cut all pieces

Using pattern pieces and measurements, cut the following – check them off as you go, and label each one.

  • Main exterior piece (join pattern piece one and pattern piece two together before cutting fabric)
  • Two outer end panel pieces (pattern piece)
  • Lining piece number 1 (use Exterior pattern piece and cut fabric on red line)
  • Lining piece number 2 (use Exterior pattern piece and cut fabric on green line)
  • Slip pocket piece (pattern piece)
  • Zip pocket piece (pattern piece)
  • Two end panel lining pieces (use End Panel pattern piece)
  • Two side binding strips, each 4x35cm
  • Two top zip binding strips, each 4x40cm
  • Two zip end pieces, each 6×12 cm

From fusible interfacing:

  • Main outer panel and two end panel pieces

See photo below to make sure you have everything you need to get started!

Zip-top purse tutorial

Step 2: Make main lining piece (Create zipped inner pocket and open pocket)

Zipped inner pocket: Lay the zip pocket lining onto lining piece 2, right sides together, matching marks for corners (X). Baste around the marked zip opening, then sew around. Cut along the dotted line, cutting out to the corners without snipping the stitching. Push the pocket lining through to the back of the main lining and press the opening flat.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

With right side of lining 2 facing upwards, lay the 18cm zip centrally behind the zip opening. Baste in place, then top-stitch neatly on all four sides of the zip opening, being sure to keep zipper pull visible in the opening. Avoid catching lining piece in this stitching, or letting machine needle hit the metal zip stop.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

Fold pocket lining upwards, right sides together, to meet top edge of main lining piece. Baste in place along top edge, then stitch sides together to create the pocket. Trim the zip ends, and baste the top edge of the pocket to the lining piece.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Slip pocket: Fold the slip pocket piece in half, wrong sides together, to make a piece 18×11 cm. Press the fold, then topstitch. Lay this pocket onto the right side of lining piece 1, matching edges Z. Lay the second lining piece (2), right side down, on top, matching edges Z again. Stitch along edge Z with 1cm seam allowance. Baste the edges of the slip pocket to lining piece 1.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

Step 3: Decorate main outer piece

If you want to decorate the outside of your purse, now’s the time. You could even piece your outer purse fabric from patchwork.

Step 4: Apply interfacing to all outer pieces

Apply the fusible interfacing to the main outer piece (once decoration is finished), and to the two end panel pieces, according to the product instructions.

Step 5: Attach lining to main outer pieces

Lay the lining, right side up, on the wrong side of the main outer piece. If your outer piece is decorated, or has a ‘front’, make sure you have the zipped pocket (in the lining) on the ‘back’ part of your main piece, to avoid a lumpy front. Baste all around to keep the lining and outer together.

Step 6: Attach lining to end panel pieces

Place each end panel lining right sides together with an end panel outer piece. Stitch along the top (straight) edge with 1cm seam allowance. Turn right sides out and press the seam, then topstitch.

Draw a curve on the two bottom corners of each end panel, drawing around a cup or something with about an 8cm diameter. Trim along the line you have drawn.

Baste the sides of each end panel to hold the layers in position, stitching within the 1cm seam allowance so stitches will not show after the purse is finished.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Step 7: Assemble purse

Match the centre bottom of an end panel piece with the centre side point of the main outer piece, lining sides together (this will seem wrong, but it’s right! The seam will be on the outside, and will be covered with binding in the next step). Pin the main outer piece around the curves of the end panel corners, snipping seam allowance to ease as necessary. The main outer piece will extend beyond the top seam of the end panel pieces on both front and back. Stitch the pieces together with a 1cm seam allowance. Clip the seam allowance where necessary to remove folds.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

Step 8: Apply binding to the purse ends

Cut two x 4cm wide binding strips, 35 cm long. If you are using a thick fabric for the exterior, bias strips will be easier to get round the curves; otherwise, you can use straight-grain strips. Starting at the top front corner of the main outer piece, pin the binding strip so that its raw edge aligns with the raw edges of the purse end. Pin all the way along the end panel seam, round to the top back corner. Stitch with a 1cm seam, then press over, away from the purse. Press under a 1cm seam allowance on the remaining raw edge, then hand stitch this down to fully enclose the raw edges of the purse end panel. Repeat for the other end panel. Trim the ends of the binding level with the purse exterior.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

Step 9: Attach the long zip to the purse

Mark the centre point on each side of your long zip. Mark the centre point on the front and back of your purse. Your zip has a ‘top’ side, where the slider runs, and a ‘bottom’ side. Placing the ‘bottom’ side of the zip to the lining, align the centre mark on one side of the zip with the centre mark on the front of the purse (pay attention to which way you want your zip to close here, ie left to right or right to left). If necessary place the zip slightly away from the raw edges of the purse, so that there is 1cm between those raw edges and the zip teeth (you need this gap for the 1cm wide binding).

Zip-top purse tutorial

Use a zipper foot to sew along the zip, with a seam allowance just less than 1cm. There should be a long piece of zip hanging over at each side of the purse. Repeat for the back of the purse. Now you should be able to zip your purse open and closed, and the zip seam will be on the outside.

Step 10 Attach binding to the zip

Cut two x 4cm wide straight-grain (not bias) binding strips, 40 cm long. Pin the binding strip on so that its raw edge aligns with the raw edges of the purse front and zip edge. Stitch with a 1cm seam, then press over, away from the zip. Press under a 1cm seam allowance on the remaining raw edge, then hand stitch this down to fully enclose the raw edges of the purse front and zip. Repeat for the back.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Zip-top purse tutorial

Step 11 Stitch zip ends down

Cut two rectangles of fabric 6×12 cm. Press long edges under by 1cm (ensure the fabric will slip closely onto the zip end). Press each end under by 1cm, then press the piece in half, to form a tab 4×5 cm.

Move the zip slider to the middle of the zip, and leave it there until you have completed this step! Trim the zip so that it is 29cm long (14.5cm from centre to each end), and slip one end piece on each end. Top stitch each piece to fix onto zip ends. Hand stitch down at mark on end panel pattern piece, trying to avoid stitching through the lining.

Zip-top purse tutorial

Done!

Zip-top purse tutorial on The Daily Stitch

Zip-top purse tutorial on The Daily Stitch

Zip-top purse tutorial on The Daily Stitch

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